Tags

, , , , , , ,

Yesterday trusty Amazon delivered to my door ‘Love at First Stitch‘ by Tilly Walnes. I’ve been following Tilly’s blog for a couple of months now and have been very envious of her self-made wardrobe. When Tilly explained on the blog that the book is for people who want to start dress making but are put off by complicated sewing jargon and confusing patterns, I knew it was the book for me!

It also helps that I really like Tilly’s style of clothes. A lot of sewing patterns that I have seen tend to be a bit more mature in style and don’t really fit in with my normal wardrobe. Tilly’s clothes are more youthful looking, and although they have a bit of a 60s feel, they are still pretty modern.

So I got my book yesterday, happily explored it’s pages in the morning, and then, like the fool I am, decided at about 9pm last night to have a go at the first project: The Brigitte Scarf.

Step 1: Lay out the pretty pink material on my tiny desk space

Step 1: Lay out the pretty pink material on my tine desk space

Look, I know better than that. I know the dangers of starting a project in the evening when you’re tired. And I know that especially for me, once 8 o’clock hits my capacity for thinking and hand-eye co-ordination rapidly declines. I know starting projects late at night are a bad idea but I did it anyway! (By the way, if you want to chuckle over other crafting pit falls, check out this article the Pinstoristy team wrote for Creative Kingdom).

Step 2: Pin the pattern on to the paper and cut it out

Step 2: Pin the pattern on to the paper and cut it out

But I ignored common sense and decided that it’s only a simple project I will be alright…and then two hours went by!

Step 3: Realise you've cut it out with big wobbly lines and spend twenty minutes fixing it before you can fold it neatly in half

Step 3: Realise you’ve cut it out with big wobbly lines and spend twenty minutes fixing it before you can fold it neatly in half

Step 4: Make a satisfying diagonal cut to create a cool corner

Step 4: Mate a satisfying diagonal cut to make a cool corner

You can see in the photos that the room is getting gradually darker and darker!

Step 5: Stitch it together, leaving a gap and turn it the right side out. Spend another 20 minutes trying to sew the gap closed because it takes you three attempts to stitch the right part.

Step 5: Stitch it together, leaving a gap and turn it the right side out. Spend another 20 minutes trying to sew the gap closed because it takes you three attempts to stitch the right part.

And yet, in the morning when the sun is shining I was delighted to see that the scarf that caused me so much hassle the night before is actually rather pretty! So after a quick iron it went straight on my head.

Step 6: Look all smug the next day when you discover that you actually like the scarf that you made yourself

Step 6: Look all smug the next day when you discover that you actually like the scarf that you made yourself

Step 7: Realise that you don't have to admit to people that it took you two hours to make a simple headscarf. No one needs to know your secret! Chuckle mischievously.

Step 7: Realise that you don’t have to admit to people that it took you two hours to make a simple headscarf. No one needs to know your secret!

So you see even in the world of crafting these words are true: There may be pain in the night, but joy comes in the morning!

Advertisements